Boos & Applause

Editor’s note: During the course of a week, issues are covered that might not lend themselves to full editorial comment, but they are worthy of The Inter-Mountain weighing in – pro, con or neutral.

Applause to everyone who took part in the Taste of Home Cooking School Thursday night at the Randolph County Armed Forces Reserve Center near Elkins. Hundreds of residents turned out for the annual Taste of Home event, which The Inter-Mountain has brought to the Elkins area since 2011. We applaud all the sponsors, volunteers and those who came to enjoy the show and the food for a job well-done (pardon us for making one last cooking pun).

Applause to Huttonsville Public Service District officials and the residents who met with them Thursday to discuss the waste water issues in Valley Bend and Dailey. The residents seem to have a legitimate concern, with some reporting sewage and waste water surfacing in their yards. We applaud them and the PSD officials for talking calmly and productively about the situation. We hope this spirit of cooperation will lead to a solution.

Applause to the Lewis County Sheriff’s Office for its continued efforts to battle the drug trade. On Thursday, deputies seized 152 marijuana plants – worth $456,000 – from a Weston residence. Then on Friday morning, deputies arrested 12 people in a drug sting. On Friday afternoon, Sheriff Adam Gissy said, “I think by arresting people in mass numbers, it sends a message to people who are distributing drugs that just because you got away with things for so long does not mean you’re going to continue to get away with it.” Gissy has been sending that message again and again in recent months. More power to him.

Boo to the “group assault” that officials say occurred Sunday on the campus of West Virginia Wesleyan College and resulted in a knife wound for one WVWC student and a broken jaw for another. Two Alderson Broaddus University students have been arrested in connection with the incident – one on Wednesday on a malicious wounding charge, another on Thursday on a misdemeanor obstructing an officer charge. Police say more arrests are possible. Folks, we’ve heard of school rivalry, but this is ridiculous. Both schools should be working overtime to get to the bottom of what happened Sunday, and why. Once that’s determined, steps should be taken to ensure that such an incident never happens again. Our local colleges are invaluable gems in this region, but parents need to feel their children will be safe when attending them. Sunday’s brawl is a major embarrassment for our area, and one that neither school should tolerate.

Boos & Applause

Editor’s note: During the course of a week, issues are covered that might not lend themselves to full editorial comment, but they are worthy of The Inter-Mountain weighing in – pro, con or neutral.

Applause to the state Legislature’s passing of a bill designed to help fund the official closing of the Elkins-Randolph County Landfill in the final hours of this year’s Legislative session. Officials are anxiously awaiting Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin’s signing the bill into law, which could lift the city of Elkins’ heavy financial burden associated with the landfill. “This is a huge win for the city of Elkins,” Mayor Van Broughton said. We agree.

Applause to actual sunshine, which local residents glimpsed sporadically this week, along with higher temperatures that actually reached 70 degrees Tuesday. By Wednesday night , however, the temperature had dipped back down to 10, amazingly. Winter isn’t letting go of us just yet, but we’ve – finally – seen the light at the end of a long, dark, cold tunnel.

Applause to the Philippi Planning Commission for tackling the project of creating a new 10-year comprehensive plan for the city. Philippi’s last 10-year plan was created in 1995, so there is quite a bit of updating to do. We applaud the Commission members’ determination to get down to work, and urge city residents to provide input on the project.

Boo to the squabbling and sniping on display in Barbour and Upshur counties during recent governmental meetings regarding E911 mapping and addressing. Many local residents have passionate – and understandable – opinions on both sides of the issue, but we should be able to expect our public officials to handle disagreements with courtesy and professionalism. E911 discussions in both counties have occasionally slipped over the line into angry, unproductive venting. Mapping and addressing is a difficult, touchy issue but it can and should be talked about in a civil manner, especially when those discussing the matter include public officials.