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NCCC members recognized

September 7, 2012
By Casey Houser - Staff Writer , The Inter-Mountain

The North Fork Watershed Project conducted a welcoming dinner this week for participants in the National Civilian Community Corps.

Americorps NCCC participants and members of the community gathered Wednesday evening at the Thomas City Park Pavilion for a night of food and socializing.

"You do work you otherwise never would have done, go to places you otherwise never would have gone and meet people you otherwise never would have met," said Adam Sievering, the NCCC team leader, when he summed up his experience of the program.

Article Photos

The Inter-Mountain photo by Casey Houser
Members of the National Civilian Community Corps gather at the Thomas City Park Pavilion this week. They were welcomed for their service in Thomas at a potluck dinner that was directed by the North Fork Watershed Project.

Each individual serving with the NCCC completes a 10-month term of service, which allows them to participate in a variety of projects in a region of the United States.

The dozen team members currently are headquartered in Beckley. They are in their third major area of service, following time spent in and around Vicksburg, Miss., as well as New Orleans.

While in Thomas, they will work to remove invasive species from the Canaan Valley Wildlife Refuge, build and repair trails along Blackwater Falls State Park and remove debris from Cottrill's Opera House in Thomas.

The work is out in the field, not behind a desk. Miguel Ortega, a volunteer from Los Angeles, said he enjoys working with his hands.

"I rebuilt a house. I spent one month in the Cumberland gap," he said. "To me, any new experience is tremendous."

Ben Wiercinski, an AmeriCorps Vista member, is working with the NCCC for the two weeks the group is in Thomas. His Vista term began in February and will last one year.

One project that he leads concerns the drainage of water out of an old mine at the north fork of Blackwater River. The water is acidic and is being monitored by him and the NCCC group.

"This is a major project, all the water pouring out of the mine," Wiercinski said.

At this point, only monitoring can take place. A full cleanup effort would require funds and personnel that are outside the range of the AmeriCorps Vista program at this time.

Each project tackled by the NCCC has its own set of demands and benefits. Some of the members suggested that friendship is perhaps the greatest of these demands - and it comes with the greatest return.

"It's, without question, the most challenging part," Sievering said, when asked what it was like to live with his group. "I am fortunate to be with the group I'm in."

"Living with 11 people has been rewarding," Ortega said.

Committing one's self to service is the bedrock of AmeriCorps.

Sievering said, "We're not in it for the profit, but we profit."

"The first recipient of service is actually you," he added, commenting that the reward of service comes from being able to help others and better one's own life in the process.

Lori Halderman, manager of the North Fork Watershed Project, works directly with Wiercinski and played host to the NCCC members during their first few days in Thomas.

She can be reached by phone at 304-259-5600 or by email at info@northforkwatershed.org.

For more information about joining Americorps, anyone interested can visit www.americorps.gov or call 202-606-5000.

Contact Casey Houser by email at chouser@theintermountain.com.By Casey Houser

Staff Writer

The North Fork Watershed Project conducted a welcoming dinner this week for participants in the National Civilian Community Corps.

Americorps NCCC participants and members of the community gathered Wednesday evening at the Thomas City Park Pavilion for a night of food and socializing.

"You do work you otherwise never would have done, go to places you otherwise never would have gone and meet people you otherwise never would have met," said Adam Sievering, the NCCC team leader, when he summed up his experience of the program.

Each individual serving with the NCCC completes a 10-month term of service, which allows them to participate in a variety of projects in a region of the United States.

The dozen team members currently are headquartered in Beckley. They are in their third major area of service, following time spent in and around Vicksburg, Miss., as well as New Orleans.

While in Thomas, they will work to remove invasive species from the Canaan Valley Wildlife Refuge, build and repair trails along Blackwater Falls State Park and remove debris from Cottrill's Opera House in Thomas.

The work is out in the field, not behind a desk. Miguel Ortega, a volunteer from Los Angeles, said he enjoys working with his hands.

"I rebuilt a house. I spent one month in the Cumberland gap," he said. "To me, any new experience is tremendous."

Ben Wiercinski, an AmeriCorps Vista member, is working with the NCCC for the two weeks the group is in Thomas. His Vista term began in February and will last one year.

One project that he leads concerns the drainage of water out of an old mine at the north fork of Blackwater River. The water is acidic and is being monitored by him and the NCCC group.

"This is a major project, all the water pouring out of the mine," Wiercinski said.

At this point, only monitoring can take place. A full cleanup effort would require funds and personnel that are outside the range of the AmeriCorps Vista program at this time.

Each project tackled by the NCCC has its own set of demands and benefits. Some of the members suggested that friendship is perhaps the greatest of these demands - and it comes with the greatest return.

"It's, without question, the most challenging part," Sievering said, when asked what it was like to live with his group. "I am fortunate to be with the group I'm in."

"Living with 11 people has been rewarding," Ortega said.

Committing one's self to service is the bedrock of AmeriCorps.

Sievering said, "We're not in it for the profit, but we profit."

"The first recipient of service is actually you," he added, commenting that the reward of service comes from being able to help others and better one's own life in the process.

Lori Halderman, manager of the North Fork Watershed Project, works directly with Wiercinski and played host to the NCCC members during their first few days in Thomas.

She can be reached by phone at 304-259-5600 or by email at info@northforkwatershed.org.

For more information about joining Americorps, anyone interested can visit www.americorps.gov or call 202-606-5000.

Contact Casey Houser by email at chouser@theintermountain.com.

 
 

 

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